Walkable West Palm Beach


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Your input needed! Shape the future of Dixie in WPB – This weekend and next week

South Dixie is undergoing a positive transformation. Significant private investment has been made, with an assortment of restaurants and retailers opening along it – but this has been in spite of the highway, not because of it. South Dixie has the advantage of a great stock of prototypical old buildings – the type of buildings necessary for entrepreneurship to flourish, as Jane Jacobs explained so well.

What it doesn’t have going for it is a hostile sidewalk environment with cars flying by at 45 mph and very little shade. A plan for a better public realm has been crafted and if executed I believe South Dixie will achieve an even greater level of success.

Highways are not places for people. What should the new name be? Dixie Avenue or something completely new?

Vested stakeholders have come together on a vision for a road diet on South Dixie that would transform it into more of a place to linger and enjoy — al fresco dining, shopping, etc. — and tame the dangerous car speeds. Many stakeholders have been involved in the process to date, including City Commissioner Paula Ryan, merchants, neighborhood associations, and residents who live adjacent to South Dixie. Read more about efforts in past posts.

Rumor is that FDOT is pushing for bike lanes up and down U.S.-1 (aka Dixie in most of the county), contradicting the well-established consensus that emerged in the South Dixie charrettes. In those charrettes led by the Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council (TCRPC), the community determined that due to the limited right of way on Dixie, volume of traffic, and priorities for placemaking, it would be best to prioritize sidewalk space and on-street parking here. Importantly, this design would slow cars more than striped bike lanes. Striped bike lanes next to travel lanes give a perception to a driver of a wider travel way than does a row of parked cars right next to the travel lanes.

Let me be clear: I’m a huge advocate for biking. I bike myself all over town and I want to see WPB embrace Dutch style biking for everyone. Dutch guidance is clear: In no case should a roadway that carries more than 15,000 cars per day consider using a bike lane. Nor should a cycle lane be considered if speeds are at or above about 30 mph. This is a good article from Cycle Toronto that explains some of these nuances in Dutch guidance. The Dutch have been doing this better than anyone for the past 40+ years, and we would be wise to learn. This simplified chart (kilometers per hour) shows the relationship between car speed and volume and separation. In short: As speeds and volumes go up, more separation is needed.

 

 

A compromised bike lane sandwiched between heavy traffic (including many Palm Tran buses) and on-street parking does not serve people on bikes well, and will only be used by the competent few – it will not attract new riders. No bike lane should be added on this stretch unless it is a physically protected bike lane (behind parked cars or a physical barrier) due to the very heavy traffic volume. Because the right of way is limited and there are issues with curb cuts/driveways, a physically protected bike lane isn’t possible unless on-street parking is removed. Maybe at some point in the future, this will be a possibility, but in the meantime, I think we should focus our resources on creating world class north/south bikeways on Lake and Flagler instead of a compromised design on U.S.-1 that will never attract anything beyond a paltry share of bike riders.

I support the Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council’s designs and I hope you will too. Please attend these very important meetings this weekend and voice your opinion in favor of the road diet, and furthermore, for the plans created by TCRPC and the community. The same could be said for sections of Dixie north and south of the TCRPC study area — the MPO should listen to the input of residents and stakeholders. Dixie is no longer a highway, it is becoming a place with distinct characteristics along its length.

Workshop is this Saturday 9 am – 2 pm at South Olive Elementary
Open studio charrettes are Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 10 am – 7 pm at City Hall. Final presentation 5 pm on Wednesday, August 30th.

Hope to see you there.

 


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Thank you, FDOT, for designing a more bike friendly Flagler Bridge

Good news, friends. We recently received an email from new FDOT District 4 Secretary Gerry O’Reilly, in followup to our requests for a better, safer design on the Flagler Bridge reconstruction. Here’s the email reply, pasted below, along with a typical bridge section.

Mr. Bailey,

We appreciate your interest in the bike facilities on the Flagler Bridge project.  The project team has reviewed your February 14, 2015 request and will implement the following lane configuration. A depiction is shown in the attached bridge typical section.

  • Reduce the vehicle travel lanes from four-12ft lanes to four-11ft lanes.  This will align with the proposed 11ft lanes east and west of the bridge.  This change provides an added benefit of increased space for bicyclists near the drainage inlets that collect storm water runoff from the bridge.
  • Provide a 2.5ft striped buffer between the travel lanes and bike lane.
  • Provide a 6ft bike lane.
  • Provide a “gutter stripe” 1.5ft from the roadway side of the barrier wall located between the bike lane and the sidewalk.

Thank you again for your continued interest in the successful completion of the Flagler Bridge project.  If you have any further questions or concerns, please contact Jim Hughes, the Department’s project manager, at 954-777-4419 or via email at james.hughes@dot.state.fl.us.

Gerry O’Reilly, PE
District Four Secretary
Florida Department of Transportation

2015-07-02 16_36_09-Flagler Roadway Plan Updated 02-19-15.pdf - Adobe Acrobat

This is a very substantial improvement in bike facilities compared to the prior design, which was essentially a bike lane that shared space in the shoulder, as we wrote about in a prior blog piece titled “Why Johnny still won’t be able to ride to the beach”. This new design narrows the travel lanes from twelve feet to eleven feet, provides a striped buffer, and a generous bike lane of 6 feet wide.

Is this the ideal outcome? No. We had hoped for a protected bike lane, with a physical barrier between cars and bicyclists. We will continue to advocate for FDOT to implement safer designs on bridges that physically separate both pedestrians and bicyclists from fast-moving cars, so that little Johnny will indeed be able to ride to the beach comfortably and safely one day.

Nonetheless, as this design was already well under way and FDOT showed a willingness to take our concerns seriously for better bike facilities, Mr. O’Reilly and staff are to be commended for hearing the community’s voice.